Posted by Kimberly Bagni on 10/15/2018

Most Americans dream of owning their own home. The size of that pictured house is often spacious. As the housing market gets tighter, the prices of homes go up. The bigger the home you wish to buy, the larger the price tag. Keep in mind that the bigger the house you buy is, the more everything else will cost. That means you have to look deep into your budget and far beyond the list price of a home to understand what you have to work with financially. Some things that a more prominent home might bring are:


Higher utility bills due to more space that you have to heat and cool

Increased property tax

Higher insurance premiums

More expensive repairs

More expensive renovations

Bigger yard to landscape


These are all additional costs that you should consider before you take the plunge to buy a larger home. The longer you live in the house, the more these expenses can add up. Many things like flooring, carpet, concrete, and roofing materials are priced by the square foot. While living large can be a great decision, the additional expenses can really add up.  


If You Have Kids, Reconsider


Raising children is expensive. While you may want your child to have a large room and a lot of amenities right inside their home, there are so many other things that kids need. Consider your childís hobbies. How much of your budget do you devote to those? Do your kids hope to attend college? How much extra money in your budget do you have for vacations and other activities that you may want to do as a family? Buying a bigger house could mean that you have less money in your budget for these things. Understand all the ways that you need to stretch your money before you have your eyes set on a larger home. 


Consider The Rest Of Your Needs


A more massive home means a more substantial monthly mortgage payment. That leaves less for you to save for things like retirement, rainy day funds, and other financial goals. Donít let the fact that you have your eyes set on a big house shadow the rest of your life and your needs. A large part of buying a home is planning ahead. It will be a smart decision all around for you and your family to buy a home thatís affordable.            


Buying a larger home fulfills a dream for many homebuyers, but donít let that idea become a singular goal.       





Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kimberly Bagni on 10/8/2018

When you move into a house, the aisles of paint at the hardware store can seem awfully overwhelming. How will you ever choose a color for each area of your home? Adding color to a home is part of what will make it your own. One of the last things that you may think of is the color of your front door. Instead of painting the entire exterior of your home, it might be a good idea to look at your front door. 


Itís not a sin to think outside of the box when it comes to the color of your front door. Why not let your house stand out from the crowd? Thereís many different colors that pop out and make great additions to any front door. Weíll break down some of the great possibilities for your front door here.


Red


Red is a great color because it goes well with many neutral tones. It brings a bit of life to a sometimes rather bland exterior color of the home. You can put a red door on a home that is a shade of tan, gray, or even white. Keep in mind that thereís also many different shades of red for you to choose from that allow you to find the tone and feel that works for you. 


Yellow Or Orange


You can certainly welcome visitors with a touch of cheeriness right at your front door. Yellow brings a certain kind of warmth to the entrance of your home. Yellow goes well with white, grays, tans, even brick and stone exteriors.


Orange needs to be used carefully. With the right tones surrounding it, you can make use of orange on your front door to make your home a bit more welcoming. Shades of orange work well with grays, blues, greens, and white exteriors. 


Earthy Tones: Green And Blue


Green and blue are great colors to help your home stand out from the crowd and provide a touch of style and warmth right at the front door. There are so many shades of green to choose from. You can go with a light green such as mint or lime. You can also choose a darker shade of green like olive or avocado. 

Green shades on a door pair well with whites, browns, tans, stone, cream, grays, and even shades of blue. 


Blue is often a color that we use more indoors. Thereís so many different shades of blue that are available. Blue doors pair well with an exterior that is gray, white, tan, stone, brick, or gray.


You can really use the front door of your home as an element of surprise. When you think of what colors go together, itís hard to go wrong with a bold front door.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kimberly Bagni on 10/1/2018

As a first-time home seller, it can be tough to establish a competitive price for your residence. And if you set a price that is too high or too low, you risk alienating potential homebuyers or missing out on an opportunity to maximize the value of your house.

Ultimately, there's a lot to think about as you determine the price for your residence. Lucky for you, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of pricing your home, regardless of the current housing market's conditions.

Let's take a look at three tips to help first-time home sellers set a competitive price for a residence.

1. Study the Real Estate Market

How does your residence stack up against similar houses that are currently available in your city or town? Study the real estate market, and you can find out how your residence compares to the competition.

Evaluate the prices of currently available houses in your city or town. With this housing market data in hand, you can learn how your home ranks against the competition and establish a price range for houses that are similar to your own.

Also, examine the prices of recently sold houses in your area. By doing so, you can find out whether you're about to enter a seller's market or a buyer's market and map out your home selling journey accordingly.

2. Perform a Home Appraisal

A home appraisal can make a world of difference, particularly for a first-time home seller who is uncertain about how to upgrade a residence.

During a home appraisal, a property inspector will examine a home's interior and exterior. After the appraisal is finished, this inspector will provide a home seller with a report that outlines his or her findings.

Take the results of a home appraisal seriously Ė you'll be glad you did. The appraisal enables a home seller to learn about a home's strengths and weaknesses, and as a result, discover the best ways to transform assorted weaknesses into strengths. Then, a home seller can perform myriad home upgrades and may be better equipped than ever before to optimize the value of a house.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent analyzes housing market patterns and trends closely and is happy to share home selling insights at any time. Thus, this housing market professional can help a home seller establish a competitive price for a home from the get-go.

Moreover, a real estate agent will promote a home to the right groups of homebuyers and work with a home seller at each stage of the property selling journey. He or she will even negotiate with homebuyers on a seller's behalf to increase the likelihood that a seller can get the best price for a residence.

When it comes to selling a home for the first time, there is no need to leave anything to chance. Use the aforementioned tips, and a first-time home seller can set a competitive price for a house and increase his or her chances of a quick home sale.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kimberly Bagni on 9/29/2018


54 Walcott Valley Drive, Hopkinton, MA 01748

Rental

$1,635
Price

5
Rooms
2
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
This bright townhouse has three floors of living space, is sparkling clean 2BR+1.5BA. Updated unit with many new finishes including ample closet and storage space in basement. In unit washer & dryer in basement. Has a deck with lovely view. Laminate flooring and brand new carpet in BR's. Granite & new appliances in kitchen with plenty of room to entertain & enjoy the comfort of home, a nice bonus is the finished walk out basement with a patio. Tenant responsible for all utilities, gas heat, electric cooking & cable. 12 month lease. First, last & security due upon signing lease. Plowing and public walkways are shoveled for your convenience. This is a non-smoking unit. Applicant(s) must have excellent credit, income & references.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses






Tags: Hopkinton   Real Estate   Rental   01748  
Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Kimberly Bagni on 9/24/2018

There are countless reasons a homeowner might want to sell their home and buy another. Some want to move for a change of scenery or to relocate for work. Others are parents with a recently empty nest who want to downsize to something more affordable that meets their needs.

The good news for second time homebuyers is that you already have an idea of what to expect when buying a home. The research, paperwork, disappointments, and delays that come with buying a home can all be prepared for. However, if you have the burden of selling your old home, finding a temporary place to live, and then moving into a new one, your responsibilities can be doubled or tripled.

In this guide, weíll go over how to prepare for selling your old home and moving into the new one. Weíll cover some common mistakes and offer some advice to keep you sane throughout this daunting (but exciting!) process.

Buying or selling first

For most homeowners, selling first makes the most sense financially. Holding onto a second house often means having to make two mortgage payments at once. Similarly, selling first will give you a much clearer idea of your budget for your new home.

Depending on market conditions, your home may or may not sell for as much as you were hoping. Itís important to keep this in mind before signing onto a new mortgage.

Moving logistics

Once you sell your home, youíll have to work out living and storage arrangements until you are ready to move into your new home. It may seem easy at first--just rent for a couple months until your move-in date, right? It isnít always that simple, however, as deals can sometimes fall through and you can find yourself with a move-out date from your own home without having finalized a deal on your new home. Because of this, many homeowners elect to may their current mortgage for an extra month or two until they can move in to their new home. 

Research your options for short-term living and storage in your area. See if you can work with moving companies who will give you a discount for helping you move twice; once to the storage facility and again to your new home.

One way around this is to time your move out and move-in dates so that you donít have to worry about storage. Some homebuyers will even move into the new home before officially closing on the home (i.e., take possession before closing). While this may be convenient, it can also be dangerous for the buyer and the seller.

Plan meticulously

One of the best piece of advice we can give is to stick to your schedule and keep good records during your buying and selling processes. Make sure whoever buys your home is aware of your plans for moving out and that anything that could delay those plans (inspection issues, moving logistics) are taken care of.  

Keeping track of all this information can be difficult, so donít be afraid to keep a daily list or planner of the things you need to take care of, and never be afraid to reach out to your real estate agent who will often be able to advise you on the best way to make your move as smooth a process as possible.







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